Potato & Rosemary Pizza

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Summer is finally here and the fresh vegetables are filling up the tables at local farmers markets.  This is the time of year that foodies live for – suddenly our culinary and artist pallets have so much to work with.

This is also the only time of year I don’t like being in the kitchen.  Who wants to add more heat to the day (or the house)?  It is a dilemma for sure, cialis buy check but not without a solution.  If you pour over any cuisine from countries where the heat of the day renders you a sloppy, cialis sales treatment sweaty mess, look you will find wonderful recipes that help battle back the heat without adding to it.  Gazpacho is one of my favorites.

Gazpacho is a cold tomato soup made with raw vegetables.  The recipe first originated in Spain and has had as many adaptations as there are vegetables in gardens. So use this base recipe as a guide and feel free to adapt as you would like.

 

Here are the basics:

  • 3 lbs. (about 7 large) Tomatoes, peeled and rough chopped
  • 3 large Cucumbers, Peeled and rough chopped
  • 1/2 large Red Onion, Diced
  • 6-7 Roasted Garlic Cloves (or 3 raw cloves, diced)
  • 2 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 2 Tbsp. Balsamic Vinegar
  • 2 1/2 cups Vegetable Stock
  • Fresh Basil and Parsley, minced
  • Salt & Pepper, to taste

Directions:

1.  Prepare tomatoes – Boil 4 cups of Water (I use my electric kettle to avoid the stove top).  Cut an “X” in the bottom of each tomato, just through the skin and pour hot water over the tomatoes.  Let them sit in the hot water for 5 minutes and then carefully peel off skins and discard them in compost.  Core tomatoes and rough chop. Place in large bowl. (NOTE: Some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

      

2.  Prepare cucumbers - Remove peel and rough chop.  Add to the bowl with tomatoes (NOTE: Once again, some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

 

3.  Dice Red Onion and add to Tomato mixture

4.  Remove skins from roasted garlic and add to Tomato mixture (or dice raw garlic) (HINT: Anytime you are roasting something, take the opportunity to throw a bulb of garlic with olive oil into the oven in a separate pan. Cool and store in sealed container with extra olive oil.  You can keep it in the refrigerator or freezer and then you always have roasted garlic on hand).

5.  Add Olive Oil, Balsamic Vinegar and Vegetable Stock to Tomato mixture.

   

6.  Blend all ingredients using an immersion blender (one of my “must have” kitchen tools) or in small batches a traditional blender.

7.  Chop herbs and add to blended gazpacho.

 

8.  Salt and Pepper to taste.

9.  Chill for 4 hours or overnight (to allow flavors to meld together) – or just dive in – I won’t tell – and it will still taste good!

10.  Garnish with fresh basil and/or edible flowers and enjoy with fresh artisan bread dipped in olive oil and balsamic vinegar and/or a fresh local cheese.  Great paired with a Madeleine Angevine or any other dry white wine with grassy/citrus notes.  We like our local Bainbridge Vineyards Madeleine Angevine.

10.  DON’T FORGET: Compost your scraps (or feed them to your chickens or put them in the worm bin)

Enjoy and stay cool. We would love to hear about what variations you come up with!

Summer is finally here and the fresh vegetables are filling up the tables at local farmers markets.  This is the time of year that foodies live for – suddenly our culinary and artist pallets have so much to work with.

This is also the only time of year I don’t like being in the kitchen.  Who wants to add more heat to the day (or the house)?  It is a dilemma for sure, buy cialis viagra sale but not without a solution.  If you pour over any cuisine from countries where the heat of the day renders you a sloppy, see
sweaty mess, viagra you will find wonderful recipes that help battle back the heat without adding to it.  Gazpacho is one of my favorites.

Gazpacho is a cold tomato soup made with raw vegetables.  The recipe first originated in Spain and has had as many adaptations as there are vegetables in gardens. So use this base recipe as a guide and feel free to adapt as you would like.

 

Here are the basics:

  • 3 lbs. (about 7 large) Tomatoes, peeled and rough chopped
  • 3 large Cucumbers, Peeled and rough chopped
  • 1/2 large Red Onion, Diced
  • 6-7 Roasted Garlic Cloves (or 3 raw cloves, diced)
  • 2 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 2 Tbsp. Balsamic Vinegar
  • 2 1/2 cups Vegetable Stock
  • Fresh Basil and Parsley, minced
  • Salt & Pepper, to taste

Directions:

1.  Prepare tomatoes – Boil 4 cups of Water (I use my electric kettle to avoid the stove top).  Cut an “X” in the bottom of each tomato, just through the skin and pour hot water over the tomatoes.  Let them sit in the hot water for 5 minutes and then carefully peel off skins and discard them in compost.  Core tomatoes and rough chop. Place in large bowl. (NOTE: Some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

      

2.  Prepare cucumbers - Remove peel and rough chop.  Add to the bowl with tomatoes (NOTE: Once again, some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

 

3.  Dice Red Onion and add to Tomato mixture

4.  Remove skins from roasted garlic and add to Tomato mixture (or dice raw garlic) (HINT: Anytime you are roasting something, take the opportunity to throw a bulb of garlic with olive oil into the oven in a separate pan. Cool and store in sealed container with extra olive oil.  You can keep it in the refrigerator or freezer and then you always have roasted garlic on hand).

5.  Add Olive Oil, Balsamic Vinegar and Vegetable Stock to Tomato mixture.

   

6.  Blend all ingredients using an immersion blender (one of my “must have” kitchen tools) or in small batches a traditional blender.

7.  Chop herbs and add to blended gazpacho.

 

8.  Salt and Pepper to taste.

9.  Chill for 4 hours or overnight (to allow flavors to meld together) – or just dive in – I won’t tell – and it will still taste good!

10.  Garnish with fresh basil and/or edible flowers and enjoy with fresh artisan bread dipped in olive oil and balsamic vinegar and/or a fresh local cheese.  Great paired with a Madeleine Angevine or any other dry white wine with grassy/citrus notes.  We like our local Bainbridge Vineyards Madeleine Angevine.

10.  DON’T FORGET: Compost your scraps (or feed them to your chickens or put them in the worm bin)

Enjoy and stay cool. We would love to hear about what variations you come up with!

Summer is finally here and the fresh vegetables are filling up the tables at local farmers markets.  This is the time of year that foodies live for – suddenly our culinary and artist pallets have so much to work with.

This is also the only time of year I don’t like being in the kitchen.  Who wants to add more heat to the day (or the house)?  It is a dilemma for sure, generic cialis recipe but not without a solution.  If you pour over any cuisine from countries where the heat of the day renders you a sloppy, levitra sweaty mess, tadalafil
you will find wonderful recipes that help battle back the heat without adding to it.  Gazpacho is one of my favorites.

Gazpacho is a cold tomato soup made with raw vegetables.  The recipe first originated in Spain and has had as many adaptations as there are vegetables in gardens. So use this base recipe as a guide and feel free to adapt as you would like.

 

Here are the basics:

  • 3 lbs. (about 7 large) Tomatoes, peeled and rough chopped
  • 3 large Cucumbers, Peeled and rough chopped
  • 1/2 large Red Onion, Diced
  • 6-7 Roasted Garlic Cloves (or 3 raw cloves, diced)
  • 2 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 2 Tbsp. Balsamic Vinegar
  • 2 1/2 cups Vegetable Stock
  • Fresh Basil and Parsley, minced
  • Salt & Pepper, to taste

Directions:

1.  Prepare tomatoes – Boil 4 cups of Water (I use my electric kettle to avoid the stove top).  Cut an “X” in the bottom of each tomato, just through the skin and pour hot water over the tomatoes.  Let them sit in the hot water for 5 minutes and then carefully peel off skins and discard them in compost.  Core tomatoes and rough chop. Place in large bowl. (NOTE: Some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

      

2.  Prepare cucumbers - Remove peel and rough chop.  Add to the bowl with tomatoes (NOTE: Once again, some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

 

3.  Dice Red Onion and add to Tomato mixture

4.  Remove skins from roasted garlic and add to Tomato mixture (or dice raw garlic) (HINT: Anytime you are roasting something, take the opportunity to throw a bulb of garlic with olive oil into the oven in a separate pan. Cool and store in sealed container with extra olive oil.  You can keep it in the refrigerator or freezer and then you always have roasted garlic on hand).

5.  Add Olive Oil, Balsamic Vinegar and Vegetable Stock to Tomato mixture.

   

6.  Blend all ingredients using an immersion blender (one of my “must have” kitchen tools) or in small batches a traditional blender.

7.  Chop herbs and add to blended gazpacho.

 

8.  Salt and Pepper to taste.

9.  Chill for 4 hours or overnight (to allow flavors to meld together) – or just dive in – I won’t tell – and it will still taste good!

10.  Garnish with fresh basil and/or edible flowers and enjoy with fresh artisan bread dipped in olive oil and balsamic vinegar and/or a fresh local cheese.  Great paired with a Madeleine Angevine or any other dry white wine with grassy/citrus notes.  We like our local Bainbridge Vineyards Madeleine Angevine.

10.  DON’T FORGET: Compost your scraps (or feed them to your chickens or put them in the worm bin)

Enjoy and stay cool. We would love to hear about what variations you come up with!

Summer is finally here and the fresh vegetables are filling up the tables at local farmers markets.  This is the time of year that foodies live for – suddenly our culinary and artist pallets have so much to work with.

This is also the only time of year I don’t like being in the kitchen.  Who wants to add more heat to the day (or the house)?  It is a dilemma for sure, tadalafil decease but not without a solution.  If you pour over any cuisine from countries where the heat of the day renders you a sloppy, for sale sweaty mess, cialis you will find wonderful recipes that help battle back the heat without adding to it.  Gazpacho is one of my favorites.

Gazpacho is a cold tomato soup made with raw vegetables.  The recipe first originated in Spain and has had as many adaptations as there are vegetables in gardens. So use this base recipe as a guide and feel free to adapt as you would like.

 

Here are the basics:

  • 3 lbs. (about 7 large) Tomatoes, peeled and rough chopped
  • 3 large Cucumbers, Peeled and rough chopped
  • 1/2 large Red Onion, Diced
  • 6-7 Roasted Garlic Cloves (or 3 raw cloves, diced)
  • 2 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 2 Tbsp. Balsamic Vinegar
  • 2 1/2 cups Vegetable Stock
  • Fresh Basil and Parsley, minced
  • Salt & Pepper, to taste

Directions:

1.  Prepare tomatoes – Boil 4 cups of Water (I use my electric kettle to avoid the stove top).  Cut an “X” in the bottom of each tomato, just through the skin and pour hot water over the tomatoes.  Let them sit in the hot water for 5 minutes and then carefully peel off skins and discard them in compost.  Core tomatoes and rough chop. Place in large bowl. (NOTE: Some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

      

2.  Prepare cucumbers - Remove peel and rough chop.  Add to the bowl with tomatoes (NOTE: Once again, some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

 

3.  Dice Red Onion and add to Tomato mixture

4.  Remove skins from roasted garlic and add to Tomato mixture (or dice raw garlic) (HINT: Anytime you are roasting something, take the opportunity to throw a bulb of garlic with olive oil into the oven in a separate pan. Cool and store in sealed container with extra olive oil.  You can keep it in the refrigerator or freezer and then you always have roasted garlic on hand).

5.  Add Olive Oil, Balsamic Vinegar and Vegetable Stock to Tomato mixture.

   

6.  Blend all ingredients using an immersion blender (one of my “must have” kitchen tools) or in small batches a traditional blender.

7.  Chop herbs and add to blended gazpacho.

 

8.  Salt and Pepper to taste.

9.  Chill for 4 hours or overnight (to allow flavors to meld together) – or just dive in – I won’t tell – and it will still taste good!

10.  Garnish with fresh basil and/or edible flowers and enjoy with fresh artisan bread dipped in olive oil and balsamic vinegar and/or a fresh local cheese.  Great paired with a Madeleine Angevine or any other dry white wine with grassy/citrus notes.  We like our local Bainbridge Vineyards Madeleine Angevine.

10.  DON’T FORGET: Compost your scraps (or feed them to your chickens or put them in the worm bin)

Enjoy and stay cool. We would love to hear about what variations you come up with!

Summer is finally here and the fresh vegetables are filling up the tables at local farmers markets.  This is the time of year that foodies live for – suddenly our culinary and artist pallets have so much to work with.

This is also the only time of year I don’t like being in the kitchen.  Who wants to add more heat to the day (or the house)?  It is a dilemma for sure, sildenafil viagra but not without a solution.  If you pour over any cuisine from countries where the heat of the day renders you a sloppy, viagra sales treatment sweaty mess, you will find wonderful recipes that help battle back the heat without adding to it.  Gazpacho is one of my favorites.

Gazpacho is a cold tomato soup made with raw vegetables.  The recipe first originated in Spain and has had as many adaptations as there are vegetables in gardens. So use this base recipe as a guide and feel free to adapt as you would like.

 

Here are the basics:

  • 3 lbs. (about 7 large) Tomatoes, peeled and rough chopped
  • 3 large Cucumbers, Peeled and rough chopped
  • 1/2 large Red Onion, Diced
  • 6-7 Roasted Garlic Cloves (or 3 raw cloves, diced)
  • 2 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 2 Tbsp. Balsamic Vinegar
  • 2 1/2 cups Vegetable Stock
  • Fresh Basil and Parsley, minced
  • Salt & Pepper, to taste

Directions:

1.  Prepare tomatoes – Boil 4 cups of Water (I use my electric kettle to avoid the stove top).  Cut an “X” in the bottom of each tomato, just through the skin and pour hot water over the tomatoes.  Let them sit in the hot water for 5 minutes and then carefully peel off skins and discard them in compost.  Core tomatoes and rough chop. Place in large bowl. (NOTE: Some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

      

2.  Prepare cucumbers - Remove peel and rough chop.  Add to the bowl with tomatoes (NOTE: Once again, some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

 

3.  Dice Red Onion and add to Tomato mixture

4.  Remove skins from roasted garlic and add to Tomato mixture (or dice raw garlic) (HINT: Anytime you are roasting something, take the opportunity to throw a bulb of garlic with olive oil into the oven in a separate pan. Cool and store in sealed container with extra olive oil.  You can keep it in the refrigerator or freezer and then you always have roasted garlic on hand).

5.  Add Olive Oil, Balsamic Vinegar and Vegetable Stock to Tomato mixture.

   

6.  Blend all ingredients using an immersion blender (one of my “must have” kitchen tools) or in small batches a traditional blender.

7.  Chop herbs and add to blended gazpacho.

 

8.  Salt and Pepper to taste.

9.  Chill for 4 hours or overnight (to allow flavors to meld together) – or just dive in – I won’t tell – and it will still taste good!

10.  Garnish with fresh basil and/or edible flowers and enjoy with fresh artisan bread dipped in olive oil and balsamic vinegar and/or a fresh local cheese.  Great paired with a Madeleine Angevine or any other dry white wine with grassy/citrus notes.  We like our local Bainbridge Vineyards Madeleine Angevine.

10.  DON’T FORGET: Compost your scraps (or feed them to your chickens or put them in the worm bin)

Enjoy and stay cool. We would love to hear about what variations you come up with!
 

If you have read any agricultural magazines or even bought a pint of Häagen-Dazs ice cream lately, cialis sales illness you know that Honeybees are in trouble. This means we could be in trouble too as Honey bees are critical to our food supply. We need bees to pollinate many of our fruits, discount viagra veggies and nuts. Without bees, we will miss out on many of our favorite (and needed) foods.

There is this mysterious disease that causes all the honeybees in the hive to just disappear – Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). There are no real conclusions to what causes CCD but there are some choices we can all make that can help the “Plight of the Honeybee”.

At Camp 4, we thoughts it would be great to just jump in and get a hive. Seemed easy enough after reading “Beekeeping for Dummies” cover to cover. What we have learned is that it is harder to keep these little beauties alive.  Honey on the grocery store shelf never looked so much like liquid gold before!

Everything started off fabulous as “newbee” beekeepers (first of many bee related jokes I am afraid).  First you get a hive and paint/stain the outside about 2 weeks before your bees arrive. No problem! We even built a little stand to set it on.

Next came the bees.. this is where things got a little more exciting. The bees show up in a buzzing box complete with about 30,000 bees and one queen.

Getting them into the hive can be tricky. First you spray them down with sugar water. Then you pull back the top of the package and pour the bees into the hive. This works really well if you have managed to coat each bees with the correct amount of sugar water. What they fail to tell you is that the ones that are not sprayed down fly up into your face when you pour them into the hive.

They also don’t tell you that every bee package opens differently. There was no easy prying back of the lid for me. Nope! I hacked my way in with a crowbar only afterwards to realise I could have just lifted the feed can off the top to let them out. Good news is that everyone (including the queen who unceremoniously flipped into the hive) made it in and I was the only one worse for wear.

So our hive was rockin’ along. Drawing out comb, laying eggs, brood (baby bees) were hatching.. smooth as silk

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. Then things got sticky (once again, pardon the bee humor).

I went one weekend without refilling their sugar water thinking they would go out and forage on the flowers, and next thing I knew, I was walking up to a hive with 1/2 of the bees dead. Ironically, it was Memorial Day.

I was so distraught. I immediately suspected CCD or local pesticide use- Damn you cruel world! But alas, this was my fault. Operator error and no one to blame but myself! I should have left the sugar water on until they stopped taking it. So what happened was the hive’s population started to double (as new babies were being born daily) and the unseasonably cool weather kept them indoors.

You can tell you have starved your bees when you find them “butts up” in the comb (meaning their little butts are up in the air because they died trying to lick the last of the honey/pollen/sugar water out of the bottom of the comb.) How sad, right? My husband has seen similar situations when I am trying to get the last of the ice cream out of the bottom of a pint (except I am not dead, just usually cranky).

After two panicked phone calls to local beekeepers for advice, I got a hold of one who told me what had happen and my next course of action. I needed to shake powdered sugar all over the hive. That way the bees that were still alive could lick it off themselves and get the energy they needed to start cleaning up my mess.

So imagine me standing over my hive in my bee suit and veil sifting powdered sugar onto a hive of 1/2 dead bees and trying not to burst into tears. (Sorry no pictures of this.. in my panic, I failed to document the carnage on film).  This is not what they share with you in “Beekeeping for Dummies” by the way.

Well, it has been six weeks later and while my queen is still alive and I have about 2000 bees left, the hive is struggling along. There are not enough worker bees to keep the brood warm and fed, so I lost about 3 frames full of brood (more tears). There are definitely not enough bees to gather nectar so no honey this year for me (even more tears). But they are trying to recover and I am pretty sure I heard “I will Survive” playing from inside the hive the other day.

So I’ll keep you posted as things develop (or don’t) in our first hive. Despite everything, this will not be our last hive. There is nothing more rewarding than discovering one of your own honeybees out in the yard gathering pollen. Makes you proud to be a “bee mom” or “new-bee mom”.

So what you can do?
If you don’t want to jump straight into keeping bees, here are some easier approaches:

Light Green Choice – Plant some bee-friendly plants in your garden/containers and don’t use pesticides! While there is nothing conclusive that says that pesticides cause CCD, it certainly doesn’t help that pesticides are everywhere in the environment. Eliminate use in your gardens and lawns. Is it really going to be the end of the world if you have few dandelions in your lawn?

Green Choice – Eliminate pesticides AND support local honey producers by purchasing their honey. Hobby hives are helping provide some diversity to the bee population. You can also buy other products that support honey bee research and only use ingredients that help honey bees.

Super Green Choice – Eliminate pesticides, buy “bee-friendly” products AND start your own hive. Don’t be discouraged from our mistakes. We are learning and you can always check back here to share what you have learned too.

Summer is finally here and the fresh vegetables are filling up the tables at local farmers markets.  This is the time of year that foodies live for – suddenly our culinary and artist pallets have so much to work with.

This is also the only time of year I don’t like being in the kitchen.  Who wants to add more heat to the day (or the house)?  It is a dilemma for sure, buy viagra stuff but not without a solution.  If you pour over any cuisine from countries where the heat of the day renders you a sloppy, thumb sweaty mess, look you will find wonderful recipes that help battle back the heat without adding to it.  Gazpacho is one of my favorites.

Gazpacho is a cold tomato soup made with raw vegetables.  The recipe first originated in Spain and has had as many adaptations as there are vegetables in gardens. So use this base recipe as a guide and feel free to adapt as you would like.

 

Here are the basics:

  • 3 lbs. (about 7 large) Tomatoes, peeled and rough chopped
  • 3 large Cucumbers, Peeled and rough chopped
  • 1/2 large Red Onion, Diced
  • 6-7 Roasted Garlic Cloves (or 3 raw cloves, diced)
  • 2 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 2 Tbsp. Balsamic Vinegar
  • 2 1/2 cups Vegetable Stock
  • Fresh Basil and Parsley, minced
  • Salt & Pepper, to taste

Directions:

1.  Prepare tomatoes – Boil 4 cups of Water (I use my electric kettle to avoid the stove top).  Cut an “X” in the bottom of each tomato, just through the skin and pour hot water over the tomatoes.  Let them sit in the hot water for 5 minutes and then carefully peel off skins and discard them in compost.  Core tomatoes and rough chop. Place in large bowl. (NOTE: Some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

      

2.  Prepare cucumbers - Remove peel and rough chop.  Add to the bowl with tomatoes (NOTE: Once again, some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

 

3.  Dice Red Onion and add to Tomato mixture

4.  Remove skins from roasted garlic and add to Tomato mixture (or dice raw garlic) (HINT: Anytime you are roasting something, take the opportunity to throw a bulb of garlic with olive oil into the oven in a separate pan. Cool and store in sealed container with extra olive oil.  You can keep it in the refrigerator or freezer and then you always have roasted garlic on hand).

5.  Add Olive Oil, Balsamic Vinegar and Vegetable Stock to Tomato mixture.

   

6.  Blend all ingredients using an immersion blender (one of my “must have” kitchen tools) or in small batches a traditional blender.

7.  Chop herbs and add to blended gazpacho.

 

8.  Salt and Pepper to taste.

9.  Chill for 4 hours or overnight (to allow flavors to meld together) – or just dive in – I won’t tell – and it will still taste good!

10.  Garnish with fresh basil and/or edible flowers and enjoy with fresh artisan bread dipped in olive oil and balsamic vinegar and/or a fresh local cheese.  Great paired with a Madeleine Angevine or any other dry white wine with grassy/citrus notes.  We like our local Bainbridge Vineyards Madeleine Angevine.

10.  DON’T FORGET: Compost your scraps (or feed them to your chickens or put them in the worm bin)

Enjoy and stay cool. We would love to hear about what variations you come up with!

Bon Appetite!

Summer is finally here and the fresh vegetables are filling up the tables at local farmers markets.  This is the time of year that foodies live for – suddenly our culinary and artist pallets have so much to work with.

This is also the only time of year I don’t like being in the kitchen.  Who wants to add more heat to the day (or the house)?  It is a dilemma for sure, viagra sale tadalafil but not without a solution.  If you pour over any cuisine from countries where the heat of the day renders you a sloppy, buy cialis sweaty mess, you will find wonderful recipes that help battle back the heat without adding to it.  Gazpacho is one of my favorites.

Gazpacho is a cold tomato soup made with raw vegetables.  The recipe first originated in Spain and has had as many adaptations as there are vegetables in gardens. So use this base recipe as a guide and feel free to adapt as you would like.

 

Here are the basics:

  • 3 lbs. (about 7 large) Tomatoes, peeled and rough chopped
  • 3 large Cucumbers, Peeled and rough chopped
  • 1/2 large Red Onion, Diced
  • 6-7 Roasted Garlic Cloves (or 3 raw cloves, diced)
  • 2 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 2 Tbsp. Balsamic Vinegar
  • 2 1/2 cups Vegetable Stock
  • Fresh Basil and Parsley, minced
  • Salt & Pepper, to taste

Directions:

1.  Prepare tomatoes – Boil 4 cups of Water (I use my electric kettle to avoid the stove top).  Cut an “X” in the bottom of each tomato, just through the skin and pour hot water over the tomatoes.  Let them sit in the hot water for 5 minutes and then carefully peel off skins and discard them in compost.  Core tomatoes and rough chop. Place in large bowl. (NOTE: Some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

      

2.  Prepare cucumbers - Remove peel and rough chop.  Add to the bowl with tomatoes (NOTE: Once again, some recipes have you remove the seeds, but I like to keep it simple)

 

3.  Dice Red Onion and add to Tomato mixture

4.  Remove skins from roasted garlic and add to Tomato mixture (or dice raw garlic) (HINT: Anytime you are roasting something, take the opportunity to throw a bulb of garlic with olive oil into the oven in a separate pan. Cool and store in sealed container with extra olive oil.  You can keep it in the refrigerator or freezer and then you always have roasted garlic on hand).

5.  Add Olive Oil, Balsamic Vinegar and Vegetable Stock to Tomato mixture.

   

6.  Blend all ingredients using an immersion blender (one of my “must have” kitchen tools) or in small batches a traditional blender.

7.  Chop herbs and add to blended gazpacho.

 

8.  Salt and Pepper to taste.

9.  Chill for 4 hours or overnight (to allow flavors to meld together) – or just dive in – I won’t tell – and it will still taste good!

10.  Garnish with fresh basil and/or edible flowers and enjoy with fresh artisan bread dipped in olive oil and balsamic vinegar and/or a fresh local cheese.  Great paired with a Madeleine Angevine or any other dry white wine with grassy/citrus notes.  We like our local Bainbridge Vineyards Madeleine Angevine.

10.  DON’T FORGET: Compost your scraps (or feed them to your chickens or put them in the worm bin)

Enjoy and stay cool. We would love to hear about what variations you come up with!

Bon Appetite!

  

Summer time is about grilling and being outside with friends and family.  We are very fortunate to live in an area where the neighbors are close (but not too close) and always good for a spontaneous get together.  Throwing the party is easy – call a few people you know and have them bring whatever they have for an appetizer and to drink – and you can get a few pizzas on the grill.

One of our go-to recipes for just such an occation is our Potato & Rosemary Pizza.  The ingredients are easy to come by and it gets the needed “oohs”, best cialis seek “aahs” and “yums” from your guests.

Here are the basics:

  • 1 pre-made/cooked pizza crust
  • 4 Tbsp Olive Oil (preferred: Rosemary Olive Oil), viagra tadalafil split
  • 3 Large Potatoes, medicine thinly sliced to 1/8″
  • 1/4 c. fresh Rosemary
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Directions:

1.  Preheat the Grill – Put a pizza stone on the bottom grate of your gas grill and an oven safe dish full of water on the top shelf (to add some humidity).  Pre-heat your gas grill and arrange the pizza stone so it is not sitting directly over the flames.

2.  Prepare Crust- We typically like to make our own crust but sometimes you just don’t have time to let the dough rise so we keep a stock of ready made crusts in our freezer.  A local baker (Patty) makes these and we get them at the Bainbridge Farmers Market.  You can also get a commercial brand, but it won’t be as good (for you or the planet).  Brush 2 Tbsp of Olive Oil on both sides of the crust using a Pastry Brush.

 3. Prepare Potatoes -Slice the Potatoes using a mandolin set at 1/8″ (or cut very thin).  We like using a variety of red, blue and yellow potatoes from Laughing Crow Farms.  Arrange on crust and generously cover with the remaining 2 Tbsp of Olive Oil making sure to cover all the potatoes evenly.  Salt and pepper to taste.

     

4. Add Rosemary – Add a generous amount of fresh rosemary to the pizza, pulling the leaves off the woody branches and scattering over the pizza evenly.

5.  Time to Grill – Pour yourself a beer (suggestions to follow) and place the pizza on the pizza stone.  Turn down heat and MAKE SURE THAT THE STONE IS NOT OVER DIRECT HEAT.  Grill for 20 – 25 minutes, checking the underside of the crust to make sure it is not burning, and until the potatoes are done (have a firm, but not crunchy bite).  Turn the burner under the stone back on for the last 3 minutes to crisp the crust but keep your eye on it so it doesn’t burn.

6.  Serve – This pizza is a fabulous addition to any party.  I prefer an Amber Beer like Alaskan Amber or one of the many micro-brews in the area.  A good non-alcoholic pairing is Juniper Berry DRY Soda.

Enjoy your party and don’t ever be afraid of pulling your community together for a little celebration.  Bon Appetite!


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