Duck Bacon Pasta Alla Carbonara

This article posted first on Family Circle.

Enjoy reading all about our adventures with our rooster and how we got started exploring the wild world of  sustainable living.

t’s 1:30 in the morning. A rooster crows. Did I really sign up for this? Well yes and no.

 
This article posted first on Family Circle.

Enjoy reading all about our adventures with our rooster and how we got started exploring the wild world of  sustainable living.

It’s 1:30 in the morning. A rooster crows. Did I really sign up for this? Well yes and no.

Yes I did. I did when we relocated our family from Chicago to Bainbridge Island, viagra sales health
Washington. The house that we fell in love with came complete with a chicken coop right outside the master bedroom window. It had everything we were looking for and apparently farm fresh eggs as well. When I told people that we had bought a house with chickens, sildenafil they reacted like we had just purchased share in “Jurassic Park”. After all, stuff what does one do with 9 chickens who lay an egg a day? Well, first you learn to eat a lot of eggs. And then you learn how easy it is to start living a more sustainable life.

Living “green”, or a life with less impact to the environment, is all the rage these days but seems so unattainable to most. Who has time to “save the planet” especially after balancing your daily life which includes managing your tween’s intense and ever changing social calendar, online or monitoring Facebook to see who is dating who this hour. But what our family has learned is that you can start with easy stuff – what we call “Light Green” – and then find more challenging things to incorporate into your life – what we call “Dark Green”.

For example, “Light Green” is NOT about buying a home with a chicken coop! It is finding a local egg farmer to buy from or purchasing Organic, Free-Range Eggs at the store. It can be as easy as planting a few herbs in container pots for your porch or unplugging appliances, cell phone chargers, and computers when not in use. These are easy, daily choices you can make that add up to a positive impact for your family and the planet.

Then there are more involved choices like building your own chicken coop, or planting a vegetable garden, or installing solar panels on your roof. These are “Dark Green” solutions that may be more disruptive but have a bigger impact. Like with a diet, I always tell people to start where you feel comfortable and work up to more involved choices when you are ready.

And this is why I call our approach “Sustainable Living” versus “Green Living” because it is a lifestyle choice that you can sustain and is better for the planet. We all have different ways to live and you can balance out your choices to work for you – some “Light Green”, some “Dark” and some that will just be indulgences. I, for one, will never give up my hot tub.

So what I didn’t sign up for? The rooster. To have eggs, you don’t need a rooster. You only need a “him” if you want to have baby chicks. Every year, we get new baby chicks from a supplier to add to our flock. This year one of those chicks ended up being a dude. So now I am faced with another sustainable living choice – find a different home for him, or find a recipe. This may take us to a whole new level or sustainable living – Super Green!

 
This article posted first on Family Circle.

Enjoy reading all about our adventures with our rooster and how we got started exploring the wild world of  sustainable living.

It’s 1:30 in the morning. A rooster crows. Did I really sign up for this? Well yes and no.

Yes I did. I did when we relocated our family from Chicago to Bainbridge Island, viagra canada seek Washington. The house that we fell in love with came complete with a chicken coop right outside the master bedroom window. It had everything we were looking for and apparently farm fresh eggs as well. When I told people that we had bought a house with chickens, purchase they reacted like we had just purchased share in “Jurassic Park”. After all, what does one do with 9 chickens who lay an egg a day? Well, first you learn to eat a lot of eggs. And then you learn how easy it is to start living a more sustainable life.

Living “green”, or a life with less impact to the environment, is all the rage these days but seems so unattainable to most. Who has time to “save the planet” especially after balancing your daily life which includes managing your tween’s intense and ever changing social calendar, or monitoring Facebook to see who is dating who this hour. But what our family has learned is that you can start with easy stuff – what we call “Light Green” – and then find more challenging things to incorporate into your life – what we call “Dark Green”.

For example, “Light Green” is NOT about buying a home with a chicken coop! It is finding a local egg farmer to buy from or purchasing Organic, Free-Range Eggs at the store. It can be as easy as planting a few herbs in container pots for your porch or unplugging appliances, cell phone chargers, and computers when not in use. These are easy, daily choices you can make that add up to a positive impact for your family and the planet.

Then there are more involved choices like building your own chicken coop, or planting a vegetable garden, or installing solar panels on your roof. These are “Dark Green” solutions that may be more disruptive but have a bigger impact. Like with a diet, I always tell people to start where you feel comfortable and work up to more involved choices when you are ready.

And this is why I call our approach “Sustainable Living” versus “Green Living” because it is a lifestyle choice that you can sustain and is better for the planet. We all have different ways to live and you can balance out your choices to work for you – some “Light Green”, some “Dark” and some that will just be indulgences. I, for one, will never give up my hot tub.

So what I didn’t sign up for? The rooster. To have eggs, you don’t need a rooster. You only need a “him” if you want to have baby chicks. Every year, we get new baby chicks from a supplier to add to our flock. This year one of those chicks ended up being a dude. So now I am faced with another sustainable living choice – find a different home for him, or find a recipe. This may take us to a whole new level or sustainable living – Super Green!

 

I made this dish for my husband’s birthday.  It features our Duck Eggs and Duck Bacon (which is essentially cured duck breast sliced on the bias and leaving the fat in place).  It was incredible!  Best eaten the same day it is prepared as over time the “sauce” is absorbed into the noodles and loses the texture.

What you need:

  • 3 duck eggs, viagra sovaldi sale room temperature
  • 1 1/2 c. Finely Grated Parmesan Cheese
  • 2 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 package (8 oz.) Duck Bacon, seek Diced
  • Kosher Salt, cialis to taste
  • 1 lb. fresh (or dried) Spaghetti
  • Fresh Ground Pepper, to taste
  • Fresh Sage, chiffonade (optional)

What you do:

  1. In a bowl, whisk together duck eggs and cheese.  Set aside.
  2. In a large skillet, warm olive oil over medium-high heat and add duck bacon.  Cook until brown and fat has rendered (8-10 minutes).
  3. Meanwhile, in a large pot of slightly salted water, cook pasta according to the manufactures instructions until al dente.
  4. Drain pasta but reserve 1 c. of cooking water
  5. Slowly whisk 1/2 c. of the reserved water into the egg-cheese mixture.
  6. Return pan with duck bacon to the heat and add pasta and the remaining reserved water to the bacon, tossing to combine.
  7. Remove pan from heat and pour in the egg-cheese mixture and toss well to combine.
  8. Generously pepper to taste and add sage to garnish.
  9. Serve immediately.

Have a Happy Birthday (or toast whatever occasion) with this great dish and a glass of local Burgundy or Pinot Noir.

Bon Appettite!

 

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